Headlines

Palmer & you

Thread_wordplay_chateau_palmer
Between The Rows

THREAD

The red thread. A theme, chosen annually, which guides us in structuring the year’s words and images, in curating our cultural events... in every expression emerging from the estate that lends meaning to our wines and to our daily lives alike.

2018

Wordplay

At Château Palmer, words make the wall.
Today, exposed, they unveil the secrets of stones.
And so it is with wordplay,
When language imbues words with fresh perspective, with reverence,
When a shift of stance, a new vantage point, reveals a hidden meaning.
These sidesteps, this delight in perspectives, defines the estate as well.
 
With one foot in its heritage, and the other in nature,
Between history and terroir,
Its vintages each reveal an unexpected reality,
Another truth, made for sharing.

 

wordplay_chateau_palmer
Initially_ours_wordplay_chateau_palmer

THROUGH PALMER'S EYE

Initially ours…

“P.E.” on one side, “P.I.” on the other. On the façade of a château erected with the 1854 vintage, near the base of each of its towers, just above their stone doors, two sets of initials remain stubbornly decipherable. Sculpted in stone, their trace endures – that of Emile Pereire and Isaac Pereire, the men who commissioned this neo-Renaissance edifice.

In the 19th century, they together rewrote the history of Palmer. Yet somehow this inscription still retains an evocative power, beyond its historic allure. Its design, so finely chiselled, so elegant and complex, echoes the wines of the estate. No ostentation, only style. They are forms of writing which are appreciated over time, in their every detail. With age, the words of Palmer take on greater meaning. And thus, the game is double. Two letters, twice over: “P.E.”, “P.I.”.

raymond depardon
EXHIBITION
LA TERRE DES PAYSANS
RAYMOND DEPARDON

“My parents knew before I did that I would never take over the farm, they were overwhelmed by my determination and my passion for photography.” Raymond Depardon. Raymond Depardon was born in France in 1942. Son of farmers, he spent his childhood on the family farm in Garet, near de Villefranche-sur-Saône,...

close

“My parents knew before I did that I would never take over the farm, they were overwhelmed by my determination and my passion for photography.” Raymond Depardon.

Raymond Depardon was born in France in 1942. Son of farmers, he spent his childhood on the family farm in Garet, near de Villefranche-sur-Saône, until at age 16 he left for Paris to become a photographer – his first passion.

For years, he travelled the globe in search of images which recount the story of our world, first as a photographer, then as a filmmaker. Yet his parents’ farm and a sense that he had abandoned it always obsessed him, to the extent that it would appear implicitly in many of his works.
In the early 1980s, a commission by DATAR (the Interministerial Delegation for Territorial Development and Regional Attractiveness) provided him the opportunity to return to his native land. At the same time, a number of media assignments allowed him to photograph farmers in other regions. The rural world became his second passion, his most beloved subject.


In publishing his 1995 book, La Ferme du Garet, Raymond Depardon explored this primal bond with his land and his heritage. It would inspire a new project, lasting over a decade, of filming rural life in mountainous regions of 21st century France. So was born the film trilogy Profils Paysans, composed of L’approche (2000), Le quotidien (2005), and La vie moderne (2008). All throughout, the photographer has never ceased to capture – first in black and wine, then in colour – fragments of our world through his lens. 


The exhibition presented by Château Palmer, with the kind participation of Magnus Photos, is based on the 2008 book of the same name, and retraces this journey by presenting several bodies of images taken between 1960 and 2007. Together, they reveal Raymond Depardon’s deep and enduring attachment to “la terre des paysans” – the farmer’s earth.

The exhibition La Terre des Paysans by Raymond Depardon may be seen only during estate visits to Château Palmer, from September 11th to December 21st 2018. Length: 2 ½ hours - €70. Reservations by e-mail: chateau-palmer@chateau-palmer.com.

 

Gilberte and Abel Jean Roy, Servance, Haute Saône, 2005 © Raymond Depardon/MagnumPhotos

Marcel Privat, Le Villaret, Lozère, 2000 © Raymond Depardon/Magnum Photos

 

Ernest_Pignon_Ernest_Chateau_Palmer
EXHIBITION
MÉMOIRE DE L'ÉPHÉMÈRE
Ernest Pignon-Ernest

A portrait of Pier Paolo Pasolini carrying his own lifeless body, pasted on walls in Ostia, Rome and Naples, the very cities where the writer and film director lived and died... Pasted along the docks in Brest, the image of a man being slammed to the wall by two others,…

close

April 2018 - A portrait of Pier Paolo Pasolini carrying his own lifeless body, pasted on walls in Ostia, Rome and Naples, the very cities where the writer and film director lived and died... Pasted along the docks in Brest, the image of a man being slammed to the wall by two others, held aloft by his arms as he is crucified – an homage to Jean Genet and his 1947 novel Querelle de Brest …

A pioneering artist, Ernest Pignon-Ernest’s works have often emerged out of literature, drawn not to be hung in museums, but to be installed in places where they will resonate with meaning. Known as a man of social commitment and modesty, the artist offers a historical and political vision of places, transforming the space where he intervenes into a veritable work of art, thus surprising passers-by an alternative reading of a quartier, a street, or an address. The works of Ernest Pignon-Ernest engage us. They are born, live and die in rhythm with the city, revealing a sacred dimension to the urban environment.
“My works arise from both a physical approach to a place a more symbolic approach to its history,” the artist explains.
“The place becomes the subject.”

The ephemeral nature of each work, its death all but preordained, is intended by Ernest Pignon-Ernest: “Fragility is one of the key elements of my work.”

Yet a singularity of the artist was the decision early in his career to photograph his works in situ, thus preserving a lasting trace of his passage. In partnership with Galerie Lelong & Co., an exhibition of 29 photographs by Ernest Pignon-Ernest at Château Palmer presents the works of this visionary artist. From Rome to Uzeste, from Naples to Paris and Brest, his oeuvre is one of imagery as wordplay, metaphors on presence and absence, the said and unsaid, poetry and political engagement, memories and the ephemeral…

The exhibition Mémoire de l’éphémère may be seen during estate visits to Château Palmer, from 5th May to 31st August 2018. To reserve, address a request by e-mail to chateau-palmer@chateau-palmer.com.

Légende : Rimbaud, Paris 1978

Bernard_Plossu_Chateau_palmer
EXHIBITION
JEUX D'ÉCRITURE
Bernard Plossu

2018 begins with a new exhibition. At Château Palmer, the photographer Bernard Plossu presents his series Jeux d’écriture. A series of 37 photographs, accompanied by texts drawn from Plossu’s published works. An exhibition organized in partnership with Bordeaux’s arrêt sur l'image galerie.

close

January 2018 – A new year of exhibitions begins at Château Palmer with the photographer Bernard Plossu, who from January 13th to April 27th 2018 will present his series Jeux d’écriture, organized in partnership with Bordeaux’s arrêt sur l'image galerie.
 
Jeux d’écriture is a series of 37 photographs by Bernard Plossu, accompanied by texts drawn from his published works*, which convey expressions of our modern times. Images captured in a moment’s luck and by a talent refined over time, with poetry, humour, and always by the same techniques: the photographer has remained ever loyal to his 50-mm lens, his analogue film and the black & white image.

Born in 1945 in South Vietnam, Bernard Plossu is a man of letters. Since the second half of the 20th century, his photographs have captured the words of our daily lives around the globe, like visual haikus. “Guns” on an Arizona shopfront, “À l’avenir” on a building in France, “Diablos en el cielo” on a wall poster in Mexico… all these messages and symbols that shape the modern landscapes around us, the photographer frames them in his images, presenting them in a new light, to render compositions both poetic and illuminating.

The exhibition Jeux d’écriture may be seen during estate visits to Château Palmer, from January 13th to April 27th 2018. To reserve, address a request by e-mail to chateau-palmer@chateau-palmer.com.
 
* “Les mots de l’image”, by Jean-Louis Fabiani and Bernard Plossu, Yellow Now
“L’hippocampe et le rétroviseur”, by François Carrassan and Bernard Plossu, Les Cahiers de l’Égaré

 

THROUGH PALMER'S EYE

A term without end

Ansault: Noun. (North America) A variety of pear.
Pannychis: Noun. An all-night feast or ceremony.
Knocker-up: Noun. (Britain) A person whose job is to go from house to house in the early morning and wake up workers by tapping on their window with a long pole.
Bit:  Noun. (North America) a unit of 12 ½ cents

These terms have disappeared. Dead on the semantic field. The professions, customs, or species which they described are no longer. And yet one need only speak them again, and suddenly they are rescued from oblivion.

Like a sentimental song that makes everyone smile, with nostalgia, musicality, and poetry, these words can speak again. From this to-and-fro between past and present, from this haunting wordplay, a truth is revealed: language is alive, both in orally and in writing. Steeped in heritage and eras, it may be resurrected over and over. Like our wines, time enriches it, without end.

A_term_without_end_wordplay_chateau_palmer